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Trane Air Conditioner Problems

I need to know what to do about Trane air conditioner problems.

Trane air conditioners tend to be really efficient and actually cool down your house when they work. They sometimes do not fit the standard concrete slab, which is a problem if you do not check dimensions first.

The unit is already installed, but it is not working as well as I thought it would.

It is hard to get a hold of replacement filters yourself for a Trane AC, especially if you want to put in a high HEPA plus filter so you do not need half a dozen air filters inside the house to minimize your allergies.

Can I buy one from Trane?

That costs as much as any other Trane part, way more than it would if you did not have to buy it from them.

I get the unit serviced around twice a year, so the filters should be replaced. That means that any reduction in efficiency is not because it is suffocating.

Their compressors sometimes have issues, and the biggest issue with that is how expensive it is to replace.

It has not stopped working, only not working as well.

Their units do not sweat a lot, in part because they are so big and efficient, but if the drain pan is cracked, you’ll have it drain into the unit or even the house.

That would cause it to rust, and that might cause it to rust through to the point of losing refrigerant. Could it be losing refrigerant already?

You’re implying it is not old.

It is around three years old.

Trane’s units are not as reliable as they used to be. The evaporator coils and condensers tend to last four to five years instead of ten.

So it could be wearing out?

Or a valve is leaking refrigerant or a weld is slowly leaking it because it has rattled something loose.

I thought it might simply be wearing out.

If the unit shakes in a regular rhythm, you could have a fan blade loose or motor that is wearing down and vibrating. If it is just louder complicated noises, there are lots of things that could be wrong.

I wonder if I’m running it too long.

Someone, somewhere, is going to blame this on global warming, climate change, or whatever they call it this week. You could blame a refrigerant leak, since a leak would cause it to cool less but run longer to try to cool the house down.

That gets to be expensive.

So are the replacement parts and refrigerant recharge, but the sooner you get it fixed, the less likely you are to find it blowing hot air.